25,000 people are good enough: The hegemonic impacts of the nielsen television ratings system

The [Nielsen] overnight numbers widely reported by the media—and Hollywood’s general barometer of a show’s health—can account for as little as 25 percent of the eventual audience for, say, an FX comedy. – Josef Adalian, New York Magazine[1] Imagine you watch every new episode of your favorite television series (for this example, NBC’s comedy Community) … Continue reading 25,000 people are good enough: The hegemonic impacts of the nielsen television ratings system

Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — Conclusions

Well, here we are. After nearly two months, I'm finally getting around to the conclusion section of my broadcast innovations research, at least for now. So now I'm left wondering, did we learn anything from all this?Obviously, I'm not so naive that I think any research I've done is reinventing even the smallest of wheels, … Continue reading Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — Conclusions

Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — NBC

Curious as to what this all means? Read my introduction to this multi-post series. Again, this whole "project" has gone on too long, but with classes finally wrapping up, I should be able to bash out the final post here in a few days. But first: America's favorite network, NBC! Did things really go as … Continue reading Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — NBC

Broadcast networks and miniseries — Will it ever happen again?

Well, I guess that headline is partially dumb and misleading, because obviously the major broadcast networks will air a miniseries at least one more time in the future. I think. But what I meant by that headline is can the broadcast networks actually air a quality miniseries? Based on my in-depth (read: mostly from Wikipedia … Continue reading Broadcast networks and miniseries — Will it ever happen again?

Should NBC pause the ticking clock on ’24?’

Last week, rumblings were that 24 would finish out its eight-year run this May on FOX. Now, Ausiello is reporting that 20th Century Fox (the studio) is pitching the series to NBC, who obviously need space-fillers on its schedule. One question for NBC: why? Let's break this down a little bit. What are the primary … Continue reading Should NBC pause the ticking clock on ’24?’

Hulu and monetization: A prospective pay model

Despite what we all want, we are eventually going to have to pay to use Hulu. Ever since the video streaming service became a major player in the television industry a few years ago, the brass at News Corp and NBC Universal have been talking about monetizing it. But fearful of the failures that came … Continue reading Hulu and monetization: A prospective pay model

Just end it already! Genre television and end dates

As we've all seen over the past month, the end of Lost has sparked a slew of different conversations about the future of television, formats, serialization, etc. One move that Lost proponents always cite as the turning point in the series was the agreement to end it all back in 2007. And now, that idea … Continue reading Just end it already! Genre television and end dates

Streaming video news part three: iTunes episodes for 99 cents?

There have been a few interesting developments in streaming video this week, all of which should have long-term implications for the television industry. I'm hoping to write about all three over the next day or so. Click here to see my thoughts on Hulu to the iPad and HBO's GO. Though this news item isn't … Continue reading Streaming video news part three: iTunes episodes for 99 cents?

Streaming video news part two: HBO GO goes live, frustrates consumers

There have been a few interesting developments in streaming video this week, all of which should have long-term implications for the television industry. I'm hoping to write about all three over the next day or so. Click here to see my thoughts on Hulu to the iPad. You know how it sucks that it takes … Continue reading Streaming video news part two: HBO GO goes live, frustrates consumers