Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — Conclusions

Well, here we are. After nearly two months, I'm finally getting around to the conclusion section of my broadcast innovations research, at least for now. So now I'm left wondering, did we learn anything from all this?Obviously, I'm not so naive that I think any research I've done is reinventing even the smallest of wheels, … Continue reading Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — Conclusions

Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — NBC

Curious as to what this all means? Read my introduction to this multi-post series. Again, this whole "project" has gone on too long, but with classes finally wrapping up, I should be able to bash out the final post here in a few days. But first: America's favorite network, NBC! Did things really go as … Continue reading Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — NBC

Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — FOX

Curious to what this all means? Read my introduction to this multi-post series. My goodness, epic apologies are in order. I remember (barely) when I started this project and hoped to run through the past five years of development for the four major broadcast networks in less than a week. Well, here we are nearly … Continue reading Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — FOX

Hulu attempts to monetize — My reaction

The time has finally come. This week, Hulu brass announced their intentions to start charging for certain bundles of content. Pay content on Hulu will begin "testing" on May 24 under the moniker "Hulu Plus," which will see a $9.95 monthly subscription base for content past the usual four-to-six new episodes of current series. This … Continue reading Hulu attempts to monetize — My reaction

What’s the future of serialization on broadcast TV?

I've talked a lot about serialization here on the blog, and it's just as popular elsewhere (check out a nice post from Myles McNutt on Justified), partially because it's the end of two major serial powerhouses in Lost and 24 and also because I think people just love talking about it. So why not continue … Continue reading What’s the future of serialization on broadcast TV?

Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — ABC

Curious as to what this all means? Read my introduction to this multi-post series. Of all the networks I researched for this project, I think ABC's results surprised me the most. And that's not a good thing. So what is the format of these posts? I'm not exactly sure. I'll play ABC this way and … Continue reading Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — ABC

Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — An introduction

Though I have been using it for more, this blog was primarily constituted for a course about the changes in what we refer to as "television." Along with this blog, I am also working on a presentation/paper about the content and format innovations from "traditional" (read: broadcast) networks in this dynamic time. Over the past … Continue reading Innovations, er, “Innovations” from broadcast networks — An introduction

Broadcast networks and miniseries — Will it ever happen again?

Well, I guess that headline is partially dumb and misleading, because obviously the major broadcast networks will air a miniseries at least one more time in the future. I think. But what I meant by that headline is can the broadcast networks actually air a quality miniseries? Based on my in-depth (read: mostly from Wikipedia … Continue reading Broadcast networks and miniseries — Will it ever happen again?

Twitter and TV viewing: Pay attention to me!

In the last week, a couple of stories have been written about the growing use of Twitter during live television events and the interactive culture created by it. So obviously, people have taken to Twitter to talking about, which allowed me to find the articles. The NY Times' Brian Stelter wrote on Tuesday about the … Continue reading Twitter and TV viewing: Pay attention to me!

Streaming video news part two: HBO GO goes live, frustrates consumers

There have been a few interesting developments in streaming video this week, all of which should have long-term implications for the television industry. I'm hoping to write about all three over the next day or so. Click here to see my thoughts on Hulu to the iPad. You know how it sucks that it takes … Continue reading Streaming video news part two: HBO GO goes live, frustrates consumers

The dead-end “dead” serial discussion: It’s not happening

I've talked a lot about serialized television lately, and it seems like a lot of TV critics and scholars have the same thing on their mind with Lost coming to an end. In the past few weeks, a slew of articles and columns have hit the web about the topic, with some writing the serials eulogy. … Continue reading The dead-end “dead” serial discussion: It’s not happening

‘M*A*S*H*’ knocked-off: Is that good for advertising?

Not to call out Professor Anderson, but recently in class, he noted that nothing would ever top the ratings of the M*A*S*H series finale, which reached 105.97 million viewers in 1983. And why wouldn't he say that? Nothing has come that close ever since, and with the slew of cable, pay-cable, OnDemand, online and other … Continue reading ‘M*A*S*H*’ knocked-off: Is that good for advertising?

‘Lost’ burnout and the frustrations of serialization

I hate to keep writing about Lost, but over the past few weeks, its return has been the best story that is being covered from all angles. Last time I discussed the end of Lost meaning the end of well-respected serialization on broadcast network television. Today, let's look at another reason why serialization, especially heavy … Continue reading ‘Lost’ burnout and the frustrations of serialization

Celebrating ‘Lost’ as a game-changer in television

Last week, I discussed why I personally thought we'd never see another television series like Lost. Well, the Lost creative brass kind of feels the same way that I do. In an interview with Jace Lacob of the Daily Beast, executive producers Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse talked about the impact that their baby has … Continue reading Celebrating ‘Lost’ as a game-changer in television