Showrunner Series: Adam Horowitz and Eddie Kitsis, Flashbacks and Self-Awareness

Welcome back to the Showrunner Series, an occasional TVS feature where I discuss the work of one or more major television voice(s). When a great, popular television series says goodbye, members of that series’ writing staff are going to be hot commodities. They’re going to be asked to run their own series, pitch their own … Continue reading Showrunner Series: Adam Horowitz and Eddie Kitsis, Flashbacks and Self-Awareness

On letting go: Musings on Lost’s final season one year after the finale

You're probably aware of this, but today is the one-year anniversary of Lost's finale episode, "The End." One year ago, the biggest television phenomenon of the 21st century came to an end, overwhelming some and frustrating/enraging more. For me personally, it's been something of a whirlwind year, especially as far as television goes. I started … Continue reading On letting go: Musings on Lost’s final season one year after the finale

#TVFail Entry 1: Lost, “Stranger in a Strange Land”

The accused: Lost, "Stranger in a Strange Land" (Season 3, Episode 9) The crime: Proving that the Lost creative team had no "real plan" to tell their story. Television’s failures are supposed to be obvious. From the overhyped non-starters that flop from the very beginning (hello, FlashForward, Lone Star) to the much-discussed clumsy conclusions of … Continue reading #TVFail Entry 1: Lost, “Stranger in a Strange Land”

TV Surveillance’s Best of 2010: The 25 Best Series, 10-1

2010 has been a fantastic year for television. This year brought us a slew of great new programs and if we include the second halves of all the series that debuted in the fall of 2009 (which I am for these features), we have probably just experienced the best run of newbies since 2004. While … Continue reading TV Surveillance’s Best of 2010: The 25 Best Series, 10-1

TV Surveillance’s Best of 2010: Top 60 Episodes, 30-21

2010 has been a fantastic year for television. This year brought us a slew of great new programs and if we include the second halves of all the series that debuted in the fall of 2009 (which I am for these features), we have probably just experienced the best run of newbies since 2004. While … Continue reading TV Surveillance’s Best of 2010: Top 60 Episodes, 30-21

2010 Emmy Predictions: Writing for Drama and Comedy Series

In case you didn’t know (because I sure as heck didn’t until I saw something the latest Entertainment Weekly), the Primetime Emmy Awards air on Sunday, August 29 on NBC. In the glow of some great nominations and not too many ridiculous slights (I’m resigned to the fact that Sons of Anarchy won’t get its due), … Continue reading 2010 Emmy Predictions: Writing for Drama and Comedy Series

TV Surveillance Dream Emmy Ballot: Writing for a Drama Series

This week I’ll be pretending that I have an Emmy vote and discussing my picks for all the major categories. Once it gets closer to the time that nominees are actually announced, I’ll do an official “picks” column. Today: Writing for a Drama Series! Two things before we get going: First, I’m only choosing performers … Continue reading TV Surveillance Dream Emmy Ballot: Writing for a Drama Series

Emotion over “answers” — Discussing storytelling approaches in the finales of Lost and Supernatural

With the round of season finales out of the way for all the major broadcast television series, I've been thinking about which finales were the most effective and why. You know, because I have absolutely nothing to do with my life during the summer -- or any time for that matter. Anyway, what is most … Continue reading Emotion over “answers” — Discussing storytelling approaches in the finales of Lost and Supernatural

The Postmortem: “Across The Sea” and response to answers

Well, what a crazy 22 hours it has been since Lost aired its most divisive, polarizing episode of all time. "Across The Sea" is a complicated mess of betrayal, mommy issues and a whole lot of metaphor. It should really be watched at least twice before passing even any substantial judgments, so I fired it … Continue reading The Postmortem: “Across The Sea” and response to answers

The slow burn versus the really slow burn — Evaluating responses to the distribution of answers in Lost and Fringe

For fans of serialized television, nothing is more important than answers. Though some might claim they love the characters or individual episodes, gun to head, most fans of Lost would probably say they're watching because they want answers to the questions that have been posed. What I've noticed this season by watching two serialized programs … Continue reading The slow burn versus the really slow burn — Evaluating responses to the distribution of answers in Lost and Fringe